Pages Review | “The House Plant” A Short Story by Jeremy Ray

“It would be the plant that lived.”


George, a fern, doesn’t appreciate being bought by Brenda at Garden Palace.
And he certainly doesn’t appreciate being trapped in her house of humans. He yearns to be with the plants outside in the garden. With time, George learns to trust Brenda and think of her as his human. Then one day, tragedy strikes and George’s life will never be the same. What happens when a houseplant loses the thing he never knew he wanted?
You’ll never look at houseplants the same way again.

Things I love: my family, my books, my plants, and anything related to them. Perhaps this is why I was so sure I would enjoy Jeremy Ray’s short story The House Plant, but I didn’t know I would love it as much as I did. I was certainly not prepared to cry. A successful short story for me is one that has the same impact as a full length novel in how it completes its narrative and delivers its message in such a limited space and without a single word wasted. The House Plant for me is that kind of an unforgettable short story.

I only began adopting house plants since May of this year, and honestly I had to stop by August because I was totally unprepared for a number of my plant babies dying when multiple typhoons hit the country. I am now slowly but surely making sure that the rest of my plants are growing well. I think I have around 30 plants including cacti and succulents at this time. As a beginner plant parent I can say that taking care of plants is much the same as taking care of any other living being, in that the experience is equal parts joy and grief. Joy when you see them healthy and thriving, grief when you just can’t figure out what you’re doing wrong that they are kept from living their best lives.

In the midst of the typhoon’s traumatic aftermath, The House Plant was the story I never knew I needed to read in order to move on and renew my energy for gardening. But please don’t get me wrong, because this is not only for plant parents, but for anyone who loves a story that is written with utmost sensitivity and humor. It is a thoughtful exploration of perceptions of beauty, happiness and contentment. It is an inspiring story full of hope and perseverance over grief and hardships. But most of all, and perhaps the reason why I loved it so much: it’s a story about love, families and the connections we make all throughout our short but meaningful lives.


Big thanks to author Jeremy Ray for gifting me a copy of The House Plant with a request for review.

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About the Author

Jeremy Ray graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a MFA in Dramatic Writing. He is the recipient of the Max K. Lerner Playwriting Fellowship for his play Boiling Point and the Shubert Playwriting Fellowship for his play Sisters of Transformation. His work has been performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, and his screenplays have placed in the PAGE International Screenwriting Awards Competition, The Academy Nicholl Fellowship, and the ScreenCraft Drama Contest.

However, he is most fond of prose. He spends his free time devouring books like the bookworm he is.

Check out more of his works at: https://litelink.at/jeremyraystories

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Book Details

The House Plant by Jeremy Ray
Kindle Edition, 31 pages
Published December 14th 2020 by Infinite Ray Publishing
ASINB08P64T6J7
Edition Language English
Genre: Literary Fiction | Short Story | Fantasy

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Buy Links

AMAZON

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One thought on “Pages Review | “The House Plant” A Short Story by Jeremy Ray

  1. It sounds like an awesome book! If I happen to see it anywhere, I would get it, too. My sisters told me some of our houseplants suffered from the bad weather, too, but the rest is doing better now. I hope you and your plants are having a better time, too. Also, if you have some plant problems and feel like sharing, you know where I am and maybe I can help or maybe we can just talk about plants, too. That would be great!

    Like

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